COVID-19 Has Changed Things – Maybe For Good

This is from Facebook. It has quite a bit of useful information in it, as far as I can tell. But it’s here for you to read and make your own opinion on how useful or not it is for you.

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New Etiquette Rules in a COVID-19 World

Here’s how the pandemic has changed our manners — maybe for good

Man and woman, two people with protective masks  greeting each other with elbows instead of handshake, alternative non-contact greeting during coronavirus epidemic, standing on the street in safe distance

Getty Images

A firm handshake, a kiss on the cheek, the clink of glasses at a dinnertime toast — these are among the polite gestures now on hold indefinitely because of social distancing guidelines intended to keep people safe during the coronavirus outbreak.

But etiquette experts say that doesn’t mean good manners have gone by the wayside. Instead, they point to safer ways of showing respect for one another, like swapping out handshakes for head nods, that have emerged in the past few months — and that will likely remain with us for some time to come.

“Etiquette is always evolving, it’s never set in stone,” says Massachusetts-based etiquette consultant Jodi Smith. “What’s set in stone is the idea of respect for myself and respect for others.”

As long as showing respect means keeping our distance and avoiding large gatherings, here’s what Smith and others say to expect when it comes to minding your manners in the COVID-19 era:



Handshakes and greetings

Myka Meier, author of Business Etiquette Made Easy, notes that few people are likely to be shaking hands at a time when staying 6 feet apart is the norm.

Even something like an elbow bump means making contact with another person and might not be appropriate in more formal settings like business meetings.

Instead, Meier recommends two totally contactless greetings: what she calls “the grasp and greet” — clasping your hands together and putting them over your heart as you approach someone — and the “stop, drop and nod” — standing still, dropping your hands and putting them behind your back (so you’re not tempted to reach out for a handshake), then nodding to say hello.

Invitations, events and RSVPs

Many large-scale gatherings and events have already been cancelled, but if you’ve RSVP’d “yes” to something that’s still scheduled to happen, international etiquette expert Sharon Schweitzer says the rules around declining have become a bit more flexible.

“Long-standing etiquette and social graces have always dictated that if you accepted the RSVP and said you would attend, you must,” she says. “However, in light of the coronavirus, you can change your RSVP to decline if you cannot attend.”

In the case of events like weddings, she says, be sure to send a gift anyway — and change your response promptly out of respect for the host (you might also want to write a personal note expressing how much you regret having to decline).

When it comes to saying no to casual invitations, like neighbors asking you to join them 6 feet apart in their backyard, the experts recommend having a go-to script to politely decline. Smith recommends something like: “I’m so thrilled that you invited me, but I’m just not ready yet.”

Having a few stock phrases in mind can also serve you well when out and about. Schweitzer’s script for keeping your distance from a friendly passerby while walking the dog is something like: “Fluffy and I are both social distancing. Please greet us from at least 6 feet away. We look forward to seeing you after this resolves. You’ll be more than welcome to pet her then!”

An assortment of face masks

EyeWolf / getty images

Masks (and more) in public

With health officials now advising that everyone wear a mask or face covering while out in public, Smith says that fashionable face coverings may become the norm as people start looking to wear masks that coordinate with their clothing.

And, she says, it wouldn’t be the first time fashion norms were shaped by public health concerns. Women of her grandmother’s generation, she notes, always wore gloves in public in part as a way of avoiding germs at a time when diseases like typhoid fever were of concern.

Of course, interacting with others with half of your face covered means losing some of the nonverbal ways we rely on to express ourselves, like smiling.

That’s where gestures come in, Smith says, since something as simple as a thumbs up or a mock salute can help you express yourself in public in the way a smile once would have.

Safety at home

We might also start to see some changes in our homes, Schweitzer says, like asking guests to remove their shoes upon entering, something that she notes is already the norm in many other cultures.

And, she says, there’s really no reason to go back to touching our glasses during a toast or blowing out birthday candles on a cake that is then served to many guests (instead, she foresees alternatives like blowing out an individual candle on your very own cupcake).

Looking to the future

Eventually, however, experts predict that most of our long-standing rituals and habits will reemerge as restrictions on our daily lives are eased.

Smith is certain, for example, that shaking hands — a gesture of goodwill that dates back as far as 5th century Greece — will become the norm in the United States once more.

“We will return to shaking hands,” she says. “It may not be until 2025, but eventually we will.”

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Watermelon Selection Chart

This was on Facebook. This will come in handy when I go to the store to buy a watermelon.

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Image may contain: food

Kelly Bagnasco

How to pick the perfect watermelon.

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Kelly Bagnasco’s Facebook entries have quite a few very interesting and informative post. I have followed her for years.

I Would Survive

This is from Facebook. I have seen other signs pointing out the same thing, but there are still people that will not be encumbered with having to put on a face mask and gloves to protect them selves and to protect others. There are many people that are following the quarantine guidelines by wearing the mandated face mask and gloves, yet they and or a member of their family still ends up being stricken by the COVID-19 virus. And when one of the family members or friends has to go it alone, all the way to the very end when they go towards the light, they probably wonder what they did wrong to be inflected by the COVID-19 virus.

Then you see it on TV, or in the news paper, and sometimes even in real life, people that either think they are invincible or just don’t give a hoot about anybody period. Not only do they run the risk of becoming stricken by the COVID-19 virus, but also death. They may not be quite as strong as they thought they were to be able fight off the virus and it ends up not only killing them, but also their family members and friends.

When this happens, there is no telling how many people will end up with the virus and dying, when it could have all been avoided if they would have only followed the mandated guidelines of the quarantine, and put on a face mask and gloves. So simple of a procedure when compared to all that has to be done when anybody dies. what with the autopsy, the clothes they have to be buried in, the casket they have to be laid to their final rest in, the vault to put the casket in, and finally the burial plot the vault with the casket inside of it has to be placed in. You’re talking about thousands if not hundreds of thousands of dollars that has to be spent on each one of the avoidable victims you caused to catch the virus,

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Important To Know Safeguards

This was on Facebook. Good to know safe guards to take.

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Image may contain: shoes, possible text that says 'Reebok'

Like This Page · April 25, 2019

Look inside your gloves, shoes and anything else you leave in your garage, workshop or outside for any length of time!


Look under your children’s playtoys before they get own or in!

It’s that time of year here in the south!

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History DOES Repeat Itself

This is from Facebook. The title is mine.

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WOW!!!! This is Tooo creepy if you ask me!!!

Have a history teacher explain this if they can.

Abraham Lincoln was elected to Congress in 1846.

John F. Kennedy was elected to Congress in 1946.

Abraham Lincoln was elected President in 1860.

John F. Kennedy was elected President in 1960.

Both were particularly concerned with civil rights.

Both wives lost a child while living in the White House.

Both Presidents were shot on a Friday.

Both Presidents were shot in the head.

Now it gets really weird.

Lincoln’s secretary was named Kennedy.

Kennedy’s Secretary was named Lincoln.

Both were assassinated by Southerners.

Both were succeeded by Southerners named Johnson.

Andrew Johnson, who succeeded Lincoln, was born in 1808.

Lyndon Johnson, who succeeded Kennedy, was born in 1908.

John Wilkes Booth, who assassinated Lincoln, was born in 1839.

Lee Harvey Oswald, who assassinated Kennedy, was born in 1939.

Both assassins were known by their three names.

Both names are composed of fifteen letters.

Now hang on to your seat.

Lincoln was shot at the theater named “Ford.”

Kennedy was shot in a car called “Lincoln” made by “Ford.”

Booth and Oswald were assassinated before their trials.

And here’s the “kicker”:

A week before Lincoln was shot, he was in Monroe, Maryland.

A week before Kennedy was shot, he was with Marilyn Monroe.

AND……………….:

Lincoln was shot in a theater and the assassin ran to a warehouse…

Kennedy was shot from a warehouse and the assassin ran to a theater..

I had to share just in case you missed this.

Foggy Eyeglasses

This is from Facebook.

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Face Masks Can Prove Tricky for Those With Eyeglasses

Science offers solutions for when your specs fog up

Man wearing glasses and face mask

| As more Americans don face masks to venture outside during the COVID-19 pandemic, many of those who wear glasses are finding that their lenses fog up. It’s a problem that bespectacled surgeons, as well as goggle-wearing skiers, have long experienced.

Why does it happen? In a 1996 article in Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics, Tom Margrain, a professor at Cardiff University’s School of Optometry and Vision Sciences, explained that in general “when a spectacle wearer enters a warm environment after having been in a cooler one, his/her spectacles may ‘mist up’ due to the formation of condensation on the lens surface.” He went on to say that polycarbonate lenses demisted more rapidly than those made of glass.

Best Face Mask Materials: Cotton With Chiffon

If you are making a homemade mask, a new study published in the scientific journal ACS Nano found that homemade face masks that use a combination of tightly woven cotton and polyester-spandex chiffon or silk will provide a very effective filter for the aerosol particles that spread the COVID-19 virus. Masks made with one layer of cotton and two layers of chiffon (a netlike fabric often found in evening gowns) or silk will filter out some 80 to 99 percent of particles — similar to the effectiveness of the N95 mask material — due to the electrostatic barrier of the fabric. But here’s the kicker: The mask must have a snug fit. Even a 1 percent gap reduces the filtering of all face masks by 50 percent or more.

With that in mind, if your eyeglasses are fogging when you put on a face mask, it’s because warm, moist air you exhale is being directed up to your glasses. To stop the fogging, you need to block your breath from reaching the surfaces of your lenses. (See instructions on how to make your own cloth face mask at home.)

The Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England published an article in 2011 that offered a simple method to prevent fogging, suggesting that, just before wearing a face mask, people wash their spectacles with soapy water, shake off the excess and then allow the lenses to air-dry.

“Washing the spectacles with soapy water leaves behind a thin surfactant film that reduces this surface tension and causes the water molecules to spread out evenly into a transparent layer,” the article reveals. “This ‘surfactant effect’ is widely utilised to prevent misting of surfaces in many everyday situations.” Antifogging solutions used for scuba masks or ski goggles also accomplish this.

Another tactic is to consider the fit of your face mask, to prevent your exhaled breath from reaching your glasses. An easy hack is to place a folded tissue between your mouth and the mask. The tissue will absorb the warm, moist air, preventing it from reaching your glasses. Also, make sure the top of your mask is tight and the bottom looser, to help direct your exhaled breath away from your eyes.

If you are using a surgical mask with ties, a 2014 article in the Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England advises going against your instincts. Tie the mask crisscross so that the top ties come below your ears and the bottom ties go above. It will make for a tighter fit.

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Needless to say, this is an easy fix. I’m going to try it next time I have to wear a mask.

Face Masks Can Prove Tricky for Those With Eyeglasses

Science offers solutions for when your specs fog up

Man wearing glasses and face mask

iStock / Getty Images Plus

En español | As more Americans don face masks to venture outside during the COVID-19 pandemic, many of those who wear glasses are finding that their lenses fog up. It’s a problem that bespectacled surgeons, as well as goggle-wearing skiers, have long experienced.


dynamic a logo mark for a a r p

Save 25% when you join AARP and enroll in Automatic Renewal for first year. Get instant access to discounts, programs, services, and the information you need to benefit every area of your life.


Why does it happen? In a 1996 article in Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics, Tom Margrain, a professor at Cardiff University’s School of Optometry and Vision Sciences, explained that in general “when a spectacle wearer enters a warm environment after having been in a cooler one, his/her spectacles may ‘mist up’ due to the formation of condensation on the lens surface.” He went on to say that polycarbonate lenses demisted more rapidly than those made of glass.

Best Face Mask Materials: Cotton With Chiffon

If you are making a homemade mask, a new study published in the scientific journal ACS Nano found that homemade face masks that use a combination of tightly woven cotton and polyester-spandex chiffon or silk will provide a very effective filter for the aerosol particles that spread the COVID-19 virus. Masks made with one layer of cotton and two layers of chiffon (a netlike fabric often found in evening gowns) or silk will filter out some 80 to 99 percent of particles — similar to the effectiveness of the N95 mask material — due to the electrostatic barrier of the fabric. But here’s the kicker: The mask must have a snug fit. Even a 1 percent gap reduces the filtering of all face masks by 50 percent or more.

With that in mind, if your eyeglasses are fogging when you put on a face mask, it’s because warm, moist air you exhale is being directed up to your glasses. To stop the fogging, you need to block your breath from reaching the surfaces of your lenses. (See instructions on how to make your own cloth face mask at home.)

The Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England published an article in 2011 that offered a simple method to prevent fogging, suggesting that, just before wearing a face mask, people wash their spectacles with soapy water, shake off the excess and then allow the lenses to air-dry.

“Washing the spectacles with soapy water leaves behind a thin surfactant film that reduces this surface tension and causes the water molecules to spread out evenly into a transparent layer,” the article reveals. “This ‘surfactant effect’ is widely utilised to prevent misting of surfaces in many everyday situations.” Antifogging solutions used for scuba masks or ski goggles also accomplish this.

Another tactic is to consider the fit of your face mask, to prevent your exhaled breath from reaching your glasses. An easy hack is to place a folded tissue between your mouth and the mask. The tissue will absorb the warm, moist air, preventing it from reaching your glasses. Also, make sure the top of your mask is tight and the bottom looser, to help direct your exhaled breath away from your eyes.

If you are using a surgical mask with ties, a 2014 article in the Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England advises going against your instincts. Tie the mask crisscross so that the top ties come below your ears and the bottom ties go above. It will make for a tighter fit.

Face Masks Can Prove Tricky for Those With Eyeglasses

Science offers solutions for when your specs fog up

Man wearing glasses and face mask

iStock / Getty Images Plus

En español | As more Americans don face masks to venture outside during the COVID-19 pandemic, many of those who wear glasses are finding that their lenses fog up. It’s a problem that bespectacled surgeons, as well as goggle-wearing skiers, have long experienced.


dynamic a logo mark for a a r p

Save 25% when you join AARP and enroll in Automatic Renewal for first year. Get instant access to discounts, programs, services, and the information you need to benefit every area of your life.


Why does it happen? In a 1996 article in Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics, Tom Margrain, a professor at Cardiff University’s School of Optometry and Vision Sciences, explained that in general “when a spectacle wearer enters a warm environment after having been in a cooler one, his/her spectacles may ‘mist up’ due to the formation of condensation on the lens surface.” He went on to say that polycarbonate lenses demisted more rapidly than those made of glass.

Best Face Mask Materials: Cotton With Chiffon

If you are making a homemade mask, a new study published in the scientific journal ACS Nano found that homemade face masks that use a combination of tightly woven cotton and polyester-spandex chiffon or silk will provide a very effective filter for the aerosol particles that spread the COVID-19 virus. Masks made with one layer of cotton and two layers of chiffon (a netlike fabric often found in evening gowns) or silk will filter out some 80 to 99 percent of particles — similar to the effectiveness of the N95 mask material — due to the electrostatic barrier of the fabric. But here’s the kicker: The mask must have a snug fit. Even a 1 percent gap reduces the filtering of all face masks by 50 percent or more.

With that in mind, if your eyeglasses are fogging when you put on a face mask, it’s because warm, moist air you exhale is being directed up to your glasses. To stop the fogging, you need to block your breath from reaching the surfaces of your lenses. (See instructions on how to make your own cloth face mask at home.)

The Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England published an article in 2011 that offered a simple method to prevent fogging, suggesting that, just before wearing a face mask, people wash their spectacles with soapy water, shake off the excess and then allow the lenses to air-dry.

“Washing the spectacles with soapy water leaves behind a thin surfactant film that reduces this surface tension and causes the water molecules to spread out evenly into a transparent layer,” the article reveals. “This ‘surfactant effect’ is widely utilised to prevent misting of surfaces in many everyday situations.” Antifogging solutions used for scuba masks or ski goggles also accomplish this.

Another tactic is to consider the fit of your face mask, to prevent your exhaled breath from reaching your glasses. An easy hack is to place a folded tissue between your mouth and the mask. The tissue will absorb the warm, moist air, preventing it from reaching your glasses. Also, make sure the top of your mask is tight and the bottom looser, to help direct your exhaled breath away from your eyes.

If you are using a surgical mask with ties, a 2014 article in the Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England advises going against your instincts. Tie the mask crisscross so that the top ties come below your ears and the bottom ties go above. It will make for a tighter fit.

Planned Parenthood

This is from Facebook.

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Zerilda Fenison Evans

22 hrs

“Once the baby is born, he/she will struggle to breathe. The baby will instinctively try to cry as he/she is cold, shocked, and struggling. As the baby tries to breathe, its small, underdeveloped lungs will be failing. Eventually, after minutes, or up to hours, the baby’s lungs will begin to collapse on themselves, causing a slow death. While this is happening, the baby will either be thrown into a bucket until the crying stops or placed on a cold counter. Alone. Naked.”

Abby Johnson: Babies are being born alive after botched abortions. We deserve to know numbers and the truth

A Small Church Pastor

This too is on Facebook. It is an article written by a Pastor of a small Church. It’s interesting to read. You will feel a lot of emotions when you read it.

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small church pastor

For years I bucked against the idea that I am a small church pastor.

Instead of seeing it as my calling, my heart and my passion, I treated it like it was my penalty for not having the skills to be a big church pastor.

So I consumed every church growth book and devoured all the “10 Reasons Your Church Isn’t Getting Bigger” lists like they were a prescription for a disease. And if the prescription was to grow your church, the disease must be that the church was small. Or so I thought.

But the antidotes didn’t cure anything, because small churches are not a sickness to overcome, a problem to fix, or a theological error to correct.

Being a small church pastor isn’t my penalty for something I’ve done, or am doing wrong.

And, since embracing it, it’s becoming an area of great joy and passion – even expertise.

Lean In to Your Ministry Calling

Imagine if you went to medical school with the idea of being the world’s greatest surgeon but, instead of having the manual dexterity for surgery, you had a surprisingly ability to diagnose diseases others missed.

But you still wanted to be a surgeon. So, instead of going into residency to become a great diagnostician, you went back to whatever school would have you, as you tried in vain to become a better surgeon.

Determined not to give up, you became stubborn. Instead of helping to spare people from years of pain and sickness by correctly identifying diseases other doctors misdiagnosed, you kept fighting a losing battle to become a surgeon.

You didn’t want to “settle” for becoming a great diagnostician, so you “overcame” your weaknesses and became a mediocre surgeon.

We don’t need more pastors trying to become something they’re not.

We need dedicated, passionate ministers who are using the gifts they’ve been given. Even if those gifts lead them to different places than they expected to go.

It’s not giving up or settling for less to recognize that you’re called to be a small church pastor. As long as you do it with all the skill and passion you have.

We need to see small church pastoring as a specialty to embrace, not a penalty to endure. When we do, everything changes.

When we stop wasting so much time and energy trying to be something we’re not, we can discover what it means to be great at what we are called to do.

You’re not a small church pastor because you’re a lousy big church pastor. You’re a small church pastor because, if you embrace it, you can be great at it.

It’s all about attitude.

Don’t see it as a penalty, make it your specialty.

This article originally appeared here.

Every State’s Risk of Severe COVID-19

This was on Facebook. It’s interesting, but scary too. Especially if you are in a state and of the age to be of high risk.

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How Every State’s Population Ranks for

Risk of Severe COVID-19 Cases

West Virginia has biggest share of at-risk adults based on age and health; Utah has smallest

A masked woman in quarantine looks out the window of her home.

mphillips007/Getty Images

En español | A few states that have announced plans to relax restrictions put in place to slow the spread of the coronavirus are among the 15 states with the largest share of adults at risk for severe illness from a coronavirus infection, according to data compiled by the Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF).

Over 41 percent of adults 18 and older in South Carolina and Tennessee — two states that have started the gradual process of returning to life as it once was — face an increased risk of hospitalization, even death, from COVID-19, the illness caused by the new coronavirus, due to age (65 and older) or an underlying health condition. In Florida, where some beaches have reopened to the public, the share of adults at risk for serious complications is just more than 42 percent. The national average is 37.6 percent.

Share of Adults 18 and Older At Higher Risk of Serious Illness If Infected With Coronavirus

united states map showing what states have more adults at higher risk of serious illness if infected with coronavirus

“It’s a major challenge to figure how to ‘reopen’ and when, but the stakes are high, particularly for people at higher risk of severe disease,” explains Robert H. Shmerling, a rheumatologist at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School in Boston. And easing up on stay-at-home orders and physical distancing guidelines too soon in areas with large high-risk populations could lead to an uptick in infection rates among those who are less able to fight off the disease.

COVID-19 could be bad news for more than 90 million adults

The majority of people who become sick with COVID-19 experience mild symptoms of fever, cough and shortness of breath, and are able to recover at home. Sometimes, however, these symptoms worsen and can become life-threatening. And public health experts say older adults and people with chronic health conditions are more likely to experience severe symptoms from the illness if infected.


In the U.S., that adds up to 92.6 million people, or more than one-third of the adult population, who are 65 and older or who have a heart disease, diabetes, lung disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma or obesity.

There isn’t one single reason why these health conditions can lead to more severe illness from COVID-19, Shmerling says, but rather a few likely explanations. Older adults, for example, tend to have less physiologic reserve, or the ability to “bounce back from damage caused by a disease the way it used to,” he explains. Eight out of 10 deaths from COVID-19 in the U.S. have been in adults 65 and older, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports.

Then there’s the increased demand on the body’s organs during the illness. The heart, for example, has to work harder when a person has a fever or is dehydrated, Shmerling notes. This can be especially taxing for someone who has pre-existing organ damage.

10 State Populations Most at Risk for Severe COVID-19

  • West Virginia, 49.3 percent
  • Kentucky, 43.6 percent
  • Arkansas, 43.5 percent
  • Alabama, 43.1 percent
  • Maine, 42.5 percent
  • Mississippi, 42.5 percent
  • Florida, 42.1 percent
  • Louisiana, 42.1 percent
  • Tennessee, 41.6 percent
  • South Carolina, 41.4 percent

Percentage of residents 65 and older, or with underlying conditions.

West Virginia has the highest share of adults at increased risk from COVID-19 complications; 49.3 percent of the state’s population is more likely to get seriously ill if infected. Kentucky is second with 43.6 percent of its adult population at high risk for severe illness. Utah has the smallest share of high-risk adults at 30 percent.

The count of 92.6 million high-risk adults doesn’t include people living in nursing homes, KFF Senior Vice President Tricia Neuman points out. This population is also more vulnerable to worse outcomes from a coronavirus infection, according to the CDC. About 1.3 million Americans live in nursing homes; an additional 800,000 live in residential care communities, according to CDC data.

“So in some ways [the data presented in the KFF report] understates the population at risk, because we know that COVID-19 is moving like a wildfire through nursing home facilities. And once one person gets infected, it’s hard for others not to get infected,” Neuman says. An added concern, she says, is that “many of these nursing homes and assisted living facilities still don’t have sufficient capacity to do testing or have PPE [personal protective equipment] on-site or even know best practices when it comes to where to move patients and how to move patients when they get sick, or to protect the staff and to protect the other residents.”

It’s important to note that people with compromised immune systems, including people undergoing treatment for cancer, also face an increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19.

Advice for people at high risk

Experts stress that it’s critical for everyone to wash their hands often, stay home as much as possible and keep at least 6 feet of distance between themselves and others. But for people at high risk for serious illness, “it’s also important to take care of the medical conditions you have,” Shmerling says.

If you have diabetes, “now is the time to be even better about not skipping doses of medication and not going off your diet,” Shmerling suggests. Also: Stay in touch with your doctor by phone or video chat, and make sure you have “an ample supply of your medications.” Finally, don’t forget to let friends and family know if you’re feeling sick or need food or other supplies, he adds.

A COVID-19 Experience from Two ICU Nurses

This is from Facebook. It is an article written by these two ICU nurses, and what it’s like having to take care of COVID-19, and watch people dying.

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Image may contain: one or more people and closeup

Image may contain: one or more people

 

I am an ICU Nurse.
Working during the COVID-19 Pandemic has been both an emotionally exhausting yet incredibly uplifting experience.

I have witnessed patients, someone’s loved one, die in an isolated room without family and friends surrounding them. They die without friends and family being able to say goodbye. And they die as a result of casualty with no time to prepare themselves or their loved ones for their death.

I’ve seen husbands and wives die within days of each other, probably leaving children, grandchildren, or even pets behind.

With such immense casualty, I have also witnessed my colleagues step up and band together as one team with one common goal- to save lives. We are doing our absolute best to save the life of every man, woman, and child that enters our Adult ICU, as we always have. Despite risks to ourselves.

We no longer have individual disciplinary responsibility. I’ve had an intern check in on me throughout the day to see if I’m doing okay or if OUR patient needs anything. Said intern took shifts with me sitting with an emotional patient so that I could get my charting done.

I’ve had a fellow offer to take direction from me via an iPAD video to draw STAT labs off an arterial line while he was in the room so that I didn’t have to enter, yet again, and risk exposing myself.

I’ve had an attending physician stop me from gathering trash in my COVID patients room and say “I know how to bag trash, but I can’t titrate these drips to keep this patient alive. Let me help you.” And another attending physician offer to sit in with an agitated patient so that I could get through change of shift without interruption.

I’ve watched my fellow nurses swap in on a coding patient because the primary nurse has reached her time max in the room and needs to leave her patient for her own safety. And I’ve seen my fellow nurses hold the hands of these dying patients while masked, gowned, and gloved from head to toe because we can’t bear to witness the misfortune of them dying alone.

I’ve seen social workers scramble to help us get in contact with patients families so that they can at least video message to say ‘goodbye’.

I’ve seen case managers work tirelessly to help us get stable patients down-graded from the ICU so that we can make room for those patients that lives depend on us.

I’ve had the immense pleasure of working closely with incredible respiratory therapists who have gone above and beyond to work as partners with nurses, collaborating on when we could enter the room simultaneously, to help reposition the patient so that someone else wouldn’t have to risk exposing themselves.

I’ve seen nurse practitioners volunteer to staff our BCU that cares for all COVID+ patients. And then collaborate closely with the nurses to schedule medications and tasks for our sickest patients so that the nurse doesn’t have to enter the room multiple times an hour.

I’ve seen pharmacists readily available to answer questions or get emergency medication ready for nurses when a patient quickly goes down hill.

I’ve seen environmental service staff enter our BCU in a timely fashion to clean the room of a deceased patient so that we can promptly admit another case.

I’ve seen leadership present on the floors offering support and reinforcements with whatever we need.

I’ve seen support staff (secretaries, patient care techs, clinic or other outpatient nurses) from all throughout our system show up on our ICU to help ensure proper gowning, gloving, and masking so that my colleagues are protected.

I’ve witnessed novice, younger nurses volunteer to work in our COVID+ Unit so that so and so who is older, so and so who is pregnant, or so and so who has young children, doesn’t have to expose themselves and their loved ones.

I’ve seen my colleagues isolate themselves from their support system, their friends and family, and stay in a hotel so that they didn’t risk exposing their husband, wife, children, or parents.

I have seen healthcare providers of every discipline step forward. I’m honored to work with each and every one of them, because despite faults that may be occurring like lack of PPE, lack of ICU beds resulting in double-bunking our sickest patients, lack of support staff, medication shortages, etc., my colleagues show up with smiles on their faces, ready to face whatever is thrown our way.

So despite what some people may think, whether this is a conspiracy, whether being quarantined at home during the Spring and maybe even Summer is ridiculous or unfair, myself and my colleagues beg you to please stay home. Stay home, stay healthy, live in the moment and be flexible. Everyone wants to come out of this alive, but not everyone is going to.

But regardless of what you do, my colleagues and I will be there for you when you need us most.