DIY – Painting Acorns

This was on Facebook. Something fun for adults and children. It will keep the children occupied for a little while at least.

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DIY – painting acorns.

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This is a really fun thing for families to do together. The best part is that they are your own creation, in that there is no wrong or right way to do it. Whatever you see in that acorn, or want it to look like, is up to you. So find some acorns, get some water based paints for the children, and oil based paints for the adults, and get started.

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Ice Cream In A Bag

This was on Facebook, Kelly Bagnasco’s page.

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Kelly Bagnasco

HOMEMADE ICE CREAM IN A BAG
Here’s one you definitely need to do with the kids!

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This would be really nice on a sweltering hot day. The kids would probably like to help you to make it.

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Easy DIY To Keep Wasps And Wood-bees Away

This is from Facebook.

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Image may contain: plant and outdoor
Jeanie Jones

Day 3 and NO wasps Or wood bees on our porch. Just a brown paper sack and I put plastic bags to fluff it out. Suppose to mimic a Hornets nest. Seems to be working.

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If any Wasps or Wood bees show up around where I live, I’ll have to try this out.

 

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Dee YoungFollow

Why this Bird looks like it’s about to drop the hardest mixtape of all time 😂🔥💯

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The Many Uses Of Peroxide

This came from Facebook, on Kelly Bagnasco’s page.

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No photo description available.

Kelly Bagnasco

Who knew?

The many uses of Peroxide 🤔

My friend has a friend who’s dad is a doctor. She was over recently and smelled the bleach, I was using to clean my toilet and counter tops.

This is what I learned that day:
She says, ‘I would like to tell you all of the benefits of that plain little ole bottle of 3% peroxide you can get for under $1.00 at any drugstore. What does bleach cost?

Most doctors don’t tell you about peroxide.

Have you ever smelled bleach in a doctor’s office? NO!!! Why? Because it smells, and it is not healthy!

Ask the nurses who work in the doctor’s offices, and ask them if they use bleach at home. They are wiser and know better!

Did you also know bleach was invented in the late ’40s? It’s chlorine, folks! And it was used to kill our troops.

Peroxide was invented during WWI.. It was used to save and help cleanse the needs of our troops and hospitals.

Please think about this:

1. Take one capful of hydrogen peroxide (the little white cap that comes with the bottle) and hold in your mouth for 10 minutes daily, then spit it out. (I am doing it when I bathe.) No more canker sores, and your teeth will be whiter without expensive pastes. Use it instead of mouthwash.

2. Let your toothbrushes soak in a cup of peroxide to keep them free of germs.

3. Clean your counters and table tops with peroxide to kill germs and leave a fresh smell. Simply put a little on your dishrag when you wipe, or spray it on the counters.

4. After rinsing off your wooden cutting board, pour peroxide on it to kill salmonella and other bacteria.

5. If you have fungus on your feet spray a 50/50 mixture of peroxide and water on them (especially the toes) every night and let dry.

6. Soak cuts in 3% peroxide for a few minutes several times a day to prevent infections. .

7. Fill a spray bottle with a 50/50 mixture of peroxide and water and keep it in every bathroom to disinfect without harming your septic system like bleach or most other disinfectants will.

8. Tilt your head back and spray into nostrils with your 50/50 mixture whenever you have a cold or plugged sinus. It will bubble and help to kill the bacteria. Hold for a few minutes, and then blow your nose into a tissue.

9. If you have a terrible toothache and cannot get to a dentist right away, put a capful of 3% peroxide into your mouth and hold it for 10 minutes several times a day. The pain will lessen greatly.

10. And of course, if you like a natural look to your hair, spray the 50/50 solution on your wet hair after a shower and comb it through. You will not have the peroxide-burnt blonde hair like the hair dye packages but more natural highlights if your hair is a light brown, reddish, or dirty blonde. It also lightens gradually, so it’s not a drastic change.

11. Put half a bottle of peroxide in your bath to help get rid of boils, fungus, or other skin infections.

12. You can also add a cup of peroxide instead of bleach to a load of whites in your laundry to whiten them. If there is blood on clothing, pour it directly on the soiled spot. Let it sit for a minute, then rub it and rinse with cold water. Repeat if necessary.

13. I use peroxide to clean my mirrors. There is no smearing, which is why I love it so much for this.

14. Another place it’s great is in the bathroom, if someone has been careless, has peed on the floor around the toilet, and it’s begun to smell of urine. Just put some peroxide in a spray bottle spray. In the blink of an eye all the smell will be gone and the bacteria eliminated! (I wish I’d known this years ago)

I could go on and on. It is a little brown bottle no home should be without! With prices of most necessities rising, I’m glad there’s a way to save tons of money in such a simple, healthy manner!

This information really woke me up. I hope you gain something from it, too. 😁

Pass it on! Clorox v/s peroxide VERY interesting and inexpensive.

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To Keep or Not To Keep

This is from Facebook. Somebody must have been spying on me. This is me all over, and all of my friends will agree if they are ever asked.

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With me, it’s not just a cardboard box, but also the plastic container, the strong plastic bag, the odd shaped jar, and so on. but there are a lot of my friends that have been very much surprised by how I have used several of these things. Last week, I did go through a lot of my plastic containers though, and threw away some with no lids and some lids with no containers. Even though I do keep a lot of stuff, for the most part my apartment doesn’t look too bad, and I can walk very easily in every room in my apartment. This is better than what I can say for some of my friends. For the most part, whenever there is something small that I need in a hurry and can’t go out to the store to buy it, I can come up with something to contain whatever it is until I can go to the store to get whatever I need.

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Foggy Eyeglasses

This is from Facebook.

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Face Masks Can Prove Tricky for Those With Eyeglasses

Science offers solutions for when your specs fog up

Man wearing glasses and face mask

| As more Americans don face masks to venture outside during the COVID-19 pandemic, many of those who wear glasses are finding that their lenses fog up. It’s a problem that bespectacled surgeons, as well as goggle-wearing skiers, have long experienced.

Why does it happen? In a 1996 article in Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics, Tom Margrain, a professor at Cardiff University’s School of Optometry and Vision Sciences, explained that in general “when a spectacle wearer enters a warm environment after having been in a cooler one, his/her spectacles may ‘mist up’ due to the formation of condensation on the lens surface.” He went on to say that polycarbonate lenses demisted more rapidly than those made of glass.

Best Face Mask Materials: Cotton With Chiffon

If you are making a homemade mask, a new study published in the scientific journal ACS Nano found that homemade face masks that use a combination of tightly woven cotton and polyester-spandex chiffon or silk will provide a very effective filter for the aerosol particles that spread the COVID-19 virus. Masks made with one layer of cotton and two layers of chiffon (a netlike fabric often found in evening gowns) or silk will filter out some 80 to 99 percent of particles — similar to the effectiveness of the N95 mask material — due to the electrostatic barrier of the fabric. But here’s the kicker: The mask must have a snug fit. Even a 1 percent gap reduces the filtering of all face masks by 50 percent or more.

With that in mind, if your eyeglasses are fogging when you put on a face mask, it’s because warm, moist air you exhale is being directed up to your glasses. To stop the fogging, you need to block your breath from reaching the surfaces of your lenses. (See instructions on how to make your own cloth face mask at home.)

The Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England published an article in 2011 that offered a simple method to prevent fogging, suggesting that, just before wearing a face mask, people wash their spectacles with soapy water, shake off the excess and then allow the lenses to air-dry.

“Washing the spectacles with soapy water leaves behind a thin surfactant film that reduces this surface tension and causes the water molecules to spread out evenly into a transparent layer,” the article reveals. “This ‘surfactant effect’ is widely utilised to prevent misting of surfaces in many everyday situations.” Antifogging solutions used for scuba masks or ski goggles also accomplish this.

Another tactic is to consider the fit of your face mask, to prevent your exhaled breath from reaching your glasses. An easy hack is to place a folded tissue between your mouth and the mask. The tissue will absorb the warm, moist air, preventing it from reaching your glasses. Also, make sure the top of your mask is tight and the bottom looser, to help direct your exhaled breath away from your eyes.

If you are using a surgical mask with ties, a 2014 article in the Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England advises going against your instincts. Tie the mask crisscross so that the top ties come below your ears and the bottom ties go above. It will make for a tighter fit.

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Needless to say, this is an easy fix. I’m going to try it next time I have to wear a mask.

Face Masks Can Prove Tricky for Those With Eyeglasses

Science offers solutions for when your specs fog up

Man wearing glasses and face mask

iStock / Getty Images Plus

En español | As more Americans don face masks to venture outside during the COVID-19 pandemic, many of those who wear glasses are finding that their lenses fog up. It’s a problem that bespectacled surgeons, as well as goggle-wearing skiers, have long experienced.


dynamic a logo mark for a a r p

Save 25% when you join AARP and enroll in Automatic Renewal for first year. Get instant access to discounts, programs, services, and the information you need to benefit every area of your life.


Why does it happen? In a 1996 article in Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics, Tom Margrain, a professor at Cardiff University’s School of Optometry and Vision Sciences, explained that in general “when a spectacle wearer enters a warm environment after having been in a cooler one, his/her spectacles may ‘mist up’ due to the formation of condensation on the lens surface.” He went on to say that polycarbonate lenses demisted more rapidly than those made of glass.

Best Face Mask Materials: Cotton With Chiffon

If you are making a homemade mask, a new study published in the scientific journal ACS Nano found that homemade face masks that use a combination of tightly woven cotton and polyester-spandex chiffon or silk will provide a very effective filter for the aerosol particles that spread the COVID-19 virus. Masks made with one layer of cotton and two layers of chiffon (a netlike fabric often found in evening gowns) or silk will filter out some 80 to 99 percent of particles — similar to the effectiveness of the N95 mask material — due to the electrostatic barrier of the fabric. But here’s the kicker: The mask must have a snug fit. Even a 1 percent gap reduces the filtering of all face masks by 50 percent or more.

With that in mind, if your eyeglasses are fogging when you put on a face mask, it’s because warm, moist air you exhale is being directed up to your glasses. To stop the fogging, you need to block your breath from reaching the surfaces of your lenses. (See instructions on how to make your own cloth face mask at home.)

The Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England published an article in 2011 that offered a simple method to prevent fogging, suggesting that, just before wearing a face mask, people wash their spectacles with soapy water, shake off the excess and then allow the lenses to air-dry.

“Washing the spectacles with soapy water leaves behind a thin surfactant film that reduces this surface tension and causes the water molecules to spread out evenly into a transparent layer,” the article reveals. “This ‘surfactant effect’ is widely utilised to prevent misting of surfaces in many everyday situations.” Antifogging solutions used for scuba masks or ski goggles also accomplish this.

Another tactic is to consider the fit of your face mask, to prevent your exhaled breath from reaching your glasses. An easy hack is to place a folded tissue between your mouth and the mask. The tissue will absorb the warm, moist air, preventing it from reaching your glasses. Also, make sure the top of your mask is tight and the bottom looser, to help direct your exhaled breath away from your eyes.

If you are using a surgical mask with ties, a 2014 article in the Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England advises going against your instincts. Tie the mask crisscross so that the top ties come below your ears and the bottom ties go above. It will make for a tighter fit.

Face Masks Can Prove Tricky for Those With Eyeglasses

Science offers solutions for when your specs fog up

Man wearing glasses and face mask

iStock / Getty Images Plus

En español | As more Americans don face masks to venture outside during the COVID-19 pandemic, many of those who wear glasses are finding that their lenses fog up. It’s a problem that bespectacled surgeons, as well as goggle-wearing skiers, have long experienced.


dynamic a logo mark for a a r p

Save 25% when you join AARP and enroll in Automatic Renewal for first year. Get instant access to discounts, programs, services, and the information you need to benefit every area of your life.


Why does it happen? In a 1996 article in Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics, Tom Margrain, a professor at Cardiff University’s School of Optometry and Vision Sciences, explained that in general “when a spectacle wearer enters a warm environment after having been in a cooler one, his/her spectacles may ‘mist up’ due to the formation of condensation on the lens surface.” He went on to say that polycarbonate lenses demisted more rapidly than those made of glass.

Best Face Mask Materials: Cotton With Chiffon

If you are making a homemade mask, a new study published in the scientific journal ACS Nano found that homemade face masks that use a combination of tightly woven cotton and polyester-spandex chiffon or silk will provide a very effective filter for the aerosol particles that spread the COVID-19 virus. Masks made with one layer of cotton and two layers of chiffon (a netlike fabric often found in evening gowns) or silk will filter out some 80 to 99 percent of particles — similar to the effectiveness of the N95 mask material — due to the electrostatic barrier of the fabric. But here’s the kicker: The mask must have a snug fit. Even a 1 percent gap reduces the filtering of all face masks by 50 percent or more.

With that in mind, if your eyeglasses are fogging when you put on a face mask, it’s because warm, moist air you exhale is being directed up to your glasses. To stop the fogging, you need to block your breath from reaching the surfaces of your lenses. (See instructions on how to make your own cloth face mask at home.)

The Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England published an article in 2011 that offered a simple method to prevent fogging, suggesting that, just before wearing a face mask, people wash their spectacles with soapy water, shake off the excess and then allow the lenses to air-dry.

“Washing the spectacles with soapy water leaves behind a thin surfactant film that reduces this surface tension and causes the water molecules to spread out evenly into a transparent layer,” the article reveals. “This ‘surfactant effect’ is widely utilised to prevent misting of surfaces in many everyday situations.” Antifogging solutions used for scuba masks or ski goggles also accomplish this.

Another tactic is to consider the fit of your face mask, to prevent your exhaled breath from reaching your glasses. An easy hack is to place a folded tissue between your mouth and the mask. The tissue will absorb the warm, moist air, preventing it from reaching your glasses. Also, make sure the top of your mask is tight and the bottom looser, to help direct your exhaled breath away from your eyes.

If you are using a surgical mask with ties, a 2014 article in the Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England advises going against your instincts. Tie the mask crisscross so that the top ties come below your ears and the bottom ties go above. It will make for a tighter fit.

Something Pretty To Cheer Us Up

This is on my Facebook today. I just thought it would help boost some spirits that are in grave need of boosting. This is so pretty and unique. I love it. And the best part is you don’t have to worry about weeds killing all of the flowers. All you have to do is find some smooth rocks of different shapes and sizes and let imaginations go with the outdoor paint. This is suitable for both children and adults alike to have fun painting.

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Ruby Stapleton Means

For all the rock painting kids that are stuck at home during this quarantine… let them paint and make a rock flower garden.

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Since the flowers are painted rocks, this is a man made flower garden.

It Is By Giving That We Receive

A little while back I was wanting to start crocheting again so that I could make and give sets of Christmas coasters to a few of my friends. After I got out my crocheting supplies, I realized that I had forgotten how to even cast on the yarn to start crocheting. I did what most people do today when they need to find out how to do something, I Googled it!

I found a website that had a video on how to begin to crochet. I proceeded to follow the instructions in the video and it came back to me after about three or four restarts on casting the yarn on the crochet hook. I read on further in the blog that went with the video and was intrigued by the section about being a part of something bigger than crocheting for myself and gifts for friends. The article mentioned crocheting a 9 inch by 7 inch block and sending it in to be part of a blanket for a needy person that doesn’t have even a blanket. I started on the block and realized that I didn’t have a ruler to measure the 9″ x 7″ to make the block. I made a makeshift pattern by doing the measurement out on a piece of paper. I soon realized that this would not even last through crocheting one block, let alone numerous blocks. That’s when I started trying to think about what types of material I needed to make a pattern that would last. I thought about just a regular piece of paper cut to the correct size and then laminating it so that it would last. I thought about doing the same thing with thin cardboard. Then I remembered a piece of Mylar that I had saved from a reusable refrigerated bag that medicine had been delivered to me in. Just read the explanation below, and look at the pictures.

With my artificial bladder, I have to put medication in my bladder daily VIA a 60 cc syringe. The syringes are delivered to me every two weeks in a reusable refrigerator bag. The bag has a piece of Mylar in the bottom of it, as well as freezer gel bricks that are also reusable.

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I have realized that the Mylar comes out of the bottom of the bag. As I crochet a few things, I decided to use some of it to make a pattern for a 9 inch by 7 inch rectangle piece for blankets. A pattern will also be made for a 6 inch square to use to measure for coasters. By using the patterns, I am assured that the blocks will all be of a uniform size. The first pattern I cut left a piece that measured 7 inches by 3 and 1/4 inches. I will find something that it can be used for I am sure.

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The block that I am working on now is going to be sent to a charity organization called warmupamerica.org  Their information is as follows,  just in case you are interested in making some blocks too.

Warm Up America! Foundation
3740 N. Josey Lane, Suite 102
Carrollton, TX 75007

Tel: 972-325-7232 | Fax: 972-215-7333

When I decided that I was going to crochet some blocks and donate them, I realized something very important, that giving to others and making a difference in their lives makes a difference in my life also. As I have heard it said before, “It is in the giving to others that we too receive.” This goes on the same premise as when you smile at someone, most of the time they will smile back. And the best part is that smiles are free. They don’t cost anything to give to someone. So too are hugs free, but with hugs you have to be more cautious than with smiles.

With the winter right here upon us, in some places, it feels good to know that I am going to help give others some warmth. I’m not usually one to do any shopping on Black Friday, but I may go and check out skeins of yarn just to see how much they cost. if they aren’t too much, I may buy some different colors of yarn, and start making blocks and sending them to Warm Up America, so that my blocks can be part of something bigger.

Doing good things for other people doesn’t have to be limited to crocheting blocks for blankets. One website that I landed on, http://www.craftsy.com/blog/2014/03/crocheting-and-knitting-for-charity/  has listed several ways to give back by crocheting and knitting different things and sending them to these different organizations. I have put links for the ones that I could find so that you can visit them if you want to. Here are the ways they listed:

1. Go national

     Project Linus  HTTPS://SEDO.COM/SEARCH/DETAILS.PHP4?DOMAIN=LINUSPROJECT.ORG&PARTNERID=49563&ORIGIN=PARTNER

Project Linus National Headquarters
PO Box 5621
Bloomington, IL 61702-5621

2. Warm Up America!

3. The Red Scarf Project   http://www.fc2success.org/programsmentoring-and-support/red-scarf-project/

Mail to: Foster Care to Success Red Scarf Project, 21351 Gentry Drive Suite 130, Sterling VA 20166.

I found out that the scarves need to be 60 inches long and 5 to 8 inches wide. The color should be some shade of red or burgundy if possible, but other colors may do. They need to be suitable for boys or girls.

4. Go local

Homeless shelters

Women’s shelters

Youth organizations

5. Nursing homes

6. When in doubt, just donate!

Try it. You just may find yourself feeling a whole lot different about life and just what is important in it.

 

Neck Towels

As I am an older lady, I have already been through the “change of life”. The doctor’s told me that the hot flashes would be gone after I finished going through the “change”. They were wrong. I still have them. But I took matters into my own hands when the perspiration got too bad. During the hot weather especially, no one would catch me without a towel around my neck.

During the “change”, come the so call it “invention” of the menopause towel. Believe you me, I didn’t just have white workout towels around my neck. I bought bath towels of every color that the store had at that time. They were cut into four strips, and a very good friend sewed the edges for me so that they wouldn’t ravel out. There were towels of every color to match every outfit that I had. My friends were really amazed at the towels, and told me that I should sell them as ‘menopause towels” and they bet that I could make a lot of money.

I never did market the towels, but I still use them to this day because I am one of those unlucky people that still has hot flashes many years after I finished going through the “change”.