GUYS TOUCH YOUR BALLS!

This post is just for the guys, no matter how young or how old you are. I taught a little boy (of only five years old) in my Sunday School Class. He almost died from testicular cancer. His only symptom was that he was having trouble passing his urine. Thank goodness his Mother took him to the pediatrician about it and found out what was wrong with him, and he survived. Guys, you need to start touching your balls on a regular basis. It could save your life. I’m not kidding.

Prostate cancer is the single most common cancer in guys. It’s also the second deadliest cancer, behind only lung cancer. So, if you’re a guy, you should be aware of early detection methods. It could mean possibly preventing this malignant menace. You need to do frequent self examinations of your balls (testicles). Get familiar with what your balls feel like all over.

If you find any lumps on your first examination, go to your doctor so you can find out if they are normal or not. If they are normal, then you have a good starting point for your future examinations. Each examination that you do from that point on should always feel the same as the first one did. You should not feel any new lumps. If at any time you feel any new lumps, GO TO YOUR DOCTOR ABOUT THEM. Early detection is the key to treatment and possible remission of the cancer.

However, if by chance they are not normal, you may have just taken the first step toward saving your life. Like I pointed out earlier, early detection of cancer is the key to being able to treat and hopefully cure the cancer.

YOU NEED TO Masturbate

Several studies conducted in the last few years have suggested that masturbation protects against prostate cancer. Actually, it was ejaculation, achieved from masturbation, that showed benefit.

Just how does ejaculation protect against prostate cancer? One theory is that it allows the prostate to clear itself of carcinogens. In other words, masturbation may literally clean your pipes.

According to the largest study of its kind, a 2004 study in the Journal of the American Medical Association, to gain any protective benefit against prostate cancer, more than 12 ejaculations per month (i.e. masturbating every other day) was necessary. What’s more, each increase of three ejaculations per week was associated with a 15% decrease in prostate cancer risk.

Eat a big bowl of cereal

There’s no arguing that Frosted Flakes taste great, but it’s not exactly the healthiest breakfast cereal. Find a cereal that’s high in flax, or simply add some flax seeds or ground flax to your favorite cereal. Fill a bowl and add some soy milk. Can’t get any more simple than that. Both flax and soy contain active ingredients that fight prostate cancer.

Eat while watching your favorite TV shows.

I Googled how to do a testicular self exam, and this is the best example that I could find. The URL is www.testicularcancersociety.org. This subject is important enough that I copied the whole article and pasted it below. Please go to the actual article for instructions about the App that is mentioned in the article.

Testicular Self Exam

Monthly testicular self exams are important to notice changes in one’s testicles. By doing the monthly testicular self exams, we’ve got an App for that, you should become familiar with your testicles thus making it easier to notice any changes.

 

Most testicular cancers are found by men themselves or their partner, very few are found by a physician. This is why it is so important to be familiar with what is normal and if you do notice any changes then see a doctor immediately.
It is best to do the testicular self exam during or right after a warm shower or bath. The warmth relaxes the scrotum making the exam easier. Don’t be alarmed if one testicle seems slightly larger than the other, that’s normal. It is also normal that one testicle will hang lower than the other.

3 Steps to the Testicular Self Exam

See a Doctor Immediately:

If you notice any testicular lumps, bumps or irregularities see a doctor right away. Please keep in mind that not all lumps or irregularities are cancerous, however, only a doctor can make that determination. Waiting to see if it will go away will not help you.

testicular-self-exam-pictures-pamphlet
There are guys that can have testicular cancer but not notice any changes in their testicle(s). That is why it is important to also know the other signs and symptoms of testicular cancer and contact your doctor if you are experiencing any of them.

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Below is the continuation of the testicular self examination article telling what the signs and symptoms of Testicular Cancer are.

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Testicular Cancer 101

What is Testicular Cancer? 

Testicular cancer can develop in one or both testicles. Most tumors are metastatic, meaning they have the ability to spread to other organs, such as the lymph system, lungs and brain, leading to serious illness or death.

Testicular cancer is rare, accounting for about 1% of all male cancers. However, testicular cancer is the most common form of cancer in men ages 15-35.

Every year, in the U.S., an estimated 8500 men are diagnosed with testicular cancer and 350 die from the disease. That averages to every hour of every day some man hears, “You have testicular cancer.”

Testicular cancer is one of the most treatable cancers, especially if caught early. If caught at an early stage, before it has spread, the survival rate is almost 100% but if caught at a late stage the rate drops to 74%.

Approximately 1 in 250 men will be diagnosed with testicular cancer. Thanks to early detection and advanced treatments, only approximately 1 in 5000 men will die from testicular cancer.

What are the Risk Factors for Testicular Cancer?

Testicular cancer is most often diagnosed in Caucasian men between the ages of 15-35. However, it can occur in men of any age and race.

Strong connections between certain lifestyles, habits or activities, such as bike riding, have not been made with testicular cancer.

Certain conditions such as undescended testicle(s), abnormal testicular development and a family history of testicular cancer may increase the odds of developing testicular cancer.

It is Important to remember that many men who develop testicular cancer have no risk factors at all.

What are the Signs of Testicular Cancer?

Men themselves, not doctors, find most testicular cancers as a painless lump or an enlargement or hardening of the testicle, this is why regular self-exams are so important. If you do notice any lumps or changes it is important to see a doctor immediately. Many men with testicular cancer do not feel ill and many times there is no pain involved.

Other Signs of Testicular Cancer are:

  • Any enlargement of a testicle
  • A significant loss of size in one of the testicles
  • A feeling of heaviness in the scrotum
  • A dull ache in the lower abdomen, back or in the groin
  • A sudden collection of fluid in the scrotum
  • Pain or discomfort in a testicle or in the scrotum
  • Enlargement or tenderness of the breasts

 

Are You a Man? THEN SELF EXAM!!!

Monthly self-testicular exams are important to notice changes in one’s testicles. Most testicular cancers are found by men themselves or their partner, very few are found by a physician. Self-testicular exams allow you to become familiar with your testicles thus making it easier to notice any changes. If you do notice any changes then see a doctor immediately.

It is best to do the self-testicular exam during or right after a warm shower or bath. The warmth relaxes the scrotum making the exam easier. Don’t be alarmed if one testicle seems slightly larger than the other, that’s normal. It is also normal that one testicle will hang lower than the other.

How to do a self testicular exam (see diagram examples)

1. If possible, stand in front of a mirror. Check for any swelling on the scrotal skin.

2. Examine each testicle with both hands. Place the index and middle fingers under the testicle with the thumbs placed on top. Firm but gently roll the testicle between the thumbs and fingers to feel for any irregularities on the surface or texture of the testicle.

3. Find the epididymis, a soft rope-like structure on the back of the testicle. If you are familiar with this structure, you won’t mistake it for a suspicious lump.

If you notice any lumps or irregularities see a doctor right away. Keep in mind that not all lumps or irregularities are cancerous, however, only a doctor can make that determination. Waiting to see if it will go away will not help you.

 

Now that you have learned how to do a self-exam just don’t throw that knowledge away.

Do your self-exam monthly; it can save your life.