We Need To Be More Accepting And Compassionate Of Others

Like the title says, we need to be more accepting and compassionate of others. This is especially true of those of us that happen to be disabled or handicapped, either from birth, from an illness, or from some sort of accident.

As those of you that have read some of my blogs may already know, I am disabled due to an illness as well as numerous orthopedic problems. For a very good summation of when the disability started, please read the blog of March 5, 2016 titled “There Is Almost Always Someone Worse Off Than You”. Below you will find a picture of what I looked like when I worked, before I lost my job for being too disabled, and having to have too many surgeries.

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One of my best friends was born with a condition called arthrogryposis as well as having spina bifida. He is unable to bend his arms, his legs, or his hands, and can only slightly bend his fingers. He can move his fingers enough to do computer work. As a matter of fact, he is a genius when it comes to computers. Below is a picture of Vladimir and his girlfriend Kalin.

Vlad and Kalin 5-11-2015

There is one very famous little boy, that people all over the world know, that is disabled due to an accident, and his name is Tripp Halstead. On Sept. 11, 2010, Tripp Hughes Halstead was born. He was injured by a tree limb falling out of a tree and hitting him in his head on the morning of Oct. 29, 2012.  He was not expected to survive the night. I have been following him since about the first or second week after his accident. Below is a picture of Tripp before the accident. he was such a smart, sweet little boy that everywhere that he went people would come to be with him.Tripp Before Accident

The next picture was right after the accident when he was in the hospital, right after his initial surgery and not expected to live. Nothing like the vivacious little boy above.Tripp After Accident and Surgery

This next picture is of how Tripp used to be right after he was discharged from the hospital to finally go back home. These were his stiff and expressionless days.

Tripp Throwback No Expression  Tripp Throwback To Stiff Times

The next picture is of Tripp now days. He still cannot do much more that have awesome facial expressions and try his hardest to move his arms and legs and to talk. He has come so far. It is just amazing. But he still has a long way to go. However, he is alive and he is happy most of the time. The two pictures bellow show some of his facial expressions.

Cool Tripp - 9-2-15Happy Tripp 2-3-16

Everyday he makes great strides in his alertness and his overall personality. Tripp is really a trooper. Nobody knows how much more he will progress, but he has already surpassed any expectations that anybody had after his accident. He is truly a miracle little boy. He tries so hard to talk, and his laugh is contagious. He just keeps progressing more and more everyday. Below is a picture of Trip with his Mom and Dada in a special article that was done on him. To read the complete article go to http://bit.ly/1QKBoDa

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My purpose in doing this article is to point out how many different ways there are that someone can become disabled or handicapped. Society needs to stop treating us like we are third class citizens and don’t deserve to even exist on this earth. My friend has helped so many people with their computers that there is absolutely no way to keep count of them. I went back to school pulling oxygen tanks and wearing a face mask. I started work looking like the picture above. All of us handicapped or disabled people fight everyday just to be able to enjoy things that most people take for granted every day of their lives. We do matter, much to some people’s dismay.

I may be wrong in my thinking, but every time somebody treats me badly or doesn’t wait long enough for me to cross the street, because the walk sign has already changed, I wish that they would have to be in a wheelchair for a few days and see just what it’s like for us. I can almost guarantee that once someone that is so call it normal ends up in a wheelchair, they will think and act quite differently from what they currently act.

There is a story that I think about every time I hear someone talk about not being able to deal with the limitations of a disabled or handicapped person. The story goes something like this: One day a disabled veteran had finally been returned to the states after a lengthy recovery form injuries received during the war. Not wanting his parents to welcome him home just because he was their son, he called them first. He went on to describe his “best friend” that needed a place to stay until he could get back on his feet. He started out by saying that the friend had night terrors and would sometimes cry and scream out in the night. His parents said that theat was OK, and that they would let him stay in the bedroom further-est away from them so his screaming would not bother anybody. The son went on to say that he had only one arm and would need help with being fed. Once again, his parents said that there would be no problem with them helping to feed him. Then came the last straw. He told them that he had no legs and had to use the bathroom in his bed or else someone had to carry him to the bathroom and physically put him on the toilet. At that point his parents said that they could not handle that. He told their son that they were sorry, but that his friend would have to find some place else to stay, that he could not stay with them. They said that it would be hard enough for him, their son, to get used to being back home and having to deal with the PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) that everybody was talking about all of the returning servicemen having to deal with. At that point the son said OK, that he understood what they were saying. Just a few hours later there came a knock at the parents door. It was the local police. They told the parents that they had found a serviceman in a phone booth that had only one arm and no legs. He had blown his head off. Unfortunately the police said that the ID was that of their son. At that point the Mother passed out. She realized that the son was feeling them out asking them about accepting the friend when it was actually him that he was talking about. He did not want to be a burden on them.

Please take the story to heart. You never know when the handicap or disability may happen to a loved one or even yourself. Learn to be more accepting and compassionate to the disabled or handicapped people that you come upon.